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Yale University (Yale)

, USA

http://www.yale.edu/

Doctoral Programs in Forestry & Environmental Studies

Specialzation:

Department:
School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Degree Type:
Doctoral
Website:
http://environment.yale.edu/about/Doctoral-Programs/
Language:
English
Description:

Currently 69 students are pursuing doctoral degrees within the School, creating a vibrant and dynamic intellectual community. Research is being conducted on almost every continent. Students pursue questions that often span disciplinary boundaries, and have both social and natural science dimensions.The Doctor of Philosophy (PH.D.) degree is conferred through the Graduate School of Yale University. Work toward this doctoral degree is directed by the Department of Forestry & Environmental Studies of the Graduate School, which is composed of the faculty of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.Doctoral work is concentrated in areas of faculty research, which currently encompass the following broad foci: agroforestry; biodiversity conservation; biostatistics and biometry; community ecology; ecosystems ecology; ecosystems management; environmental biophysics and meteorology; environmental chemistry; environmental ethics; environmental governance; environmental health risk assessment; environmental history; environmental law and politics; environmental and resource policy; forest ecology; hydrology; industrial ecology; industrial environmental management; plant physiology and anatomy; pollution management; population ecology; resource economics; energy and the environment, silviculture, social ecology; stand development, tropical ecology, and conservation; urban planning; water resource management; environmental management and social ecology in developing countries.

Keywords:
sustainability,agroforestry,biodiversity,conservation,ecosystems,environmental management,biophysics,meteorology,pollution

Joint Master's Degree Program in Business and the Environment

Specialzation:

Department:
Center for Business and the Environment
Degree Type:
Masters
Website:
http://environment.yale.edu/academics/degrees/joint/mba
Language:
English
Description:

As the longest standing business and environment program in the world, Yale offers a 3-year joint master's degree program that combines an MBA at the School of Management with a master's degree in environment or forestry from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. The Center for Business and the Environment at Yale serves as the administrative home for this joint degree program. Joint degree students are active in defining the direction of the Center, lending energy, ideas, and contacts to the ever-evolving set of activities pursued by the Center. Students benefit in turn from the centralized resources, established network, and administrative support provided by the Center. F&ES and SOM: Two Schools, One Value PropositionSOM seeks to educate leaders for business and society and FES promises an education that provides training to help graduates to achieve fair and effective solutions to environmental problems. These two missions are united in the work oat the Center for Business and the Environment.Access to renowned faculty, leading professionals, and world leaders. Professors engage students with their teaching and bring their world-class research into the classroom. In the Yale tradition, learning takes place in small, intimate settings.International research, professional connections, and hands-on consulting opportunities combine with a close-knit collegial culture to create the next generation of practitioners and innovative leaders. Outstanding students from business, government, and nonprofit backgrounds around the world form a strong network of alumni who share the goal of providing value to society at large.

Keywords:
sustainability,energy,environmental management,ecology,sustainable development,conservation,land use,water,ecosystems

Master of Environmental Management (MEM)

Specialzation:

Department:
School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Degree Type:
Masters
Website:
http://environment.yale.edu/academics/degrees/mem
Language:
English
Description:

This degree is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in environmental policy and analysis, stewardship, education, consulting, or management. The program requires course work in both the natural and social sciences, with a focus on the complex relationship among science, management, and policy. The purpose of the program is to provide students with a scientific understanding of ecological and social systems that can be applied in a policy or management context. Students pursuing the MEM degree must complete seven distributional courses. In consultation with an academic advisor, each student will select appropriate courses to build foundational training for advanced study. Each student will also identify an advanced study program for further coursework, concluding his or her experience with a master's project.Students choose one core course from each of the following foundational areas: earth and climate science; ecosystem science and biodiversity; sustainable development and social ecology; economics; policy, institutions and law; environmental health and urban and industrial ecosystems; and information and data analysis. Course options are listed at the end of this section. Students are expected to gain advanced training in a concentration of their choosing. The advanced curriculum should lead to rigorous, in-depth expertise in some aspect of environmental science, policy or management. Students will work with their academic advisor to identify an advanced course structure that meets their professional goals. Faculty strengths in teaching and research at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies are broadly represented by nine advanced topic areas: Ecology, ecosystems and biodiversity; The social ecology of conservation and development; Forest science, management, and conservation; Global change science and policy; Environment, health, and policy; Industrial environmental management training; Policy, economics, and law; Urban ecology and environmental design; Water science, policy, and managementProject courses can involve research in laboratory, field, or library, or analytical case studies designed to solve management problems. Master's degree projects often originate with the student, with guidance from faculty members with expertise in the subject matter. Projects require an official faculty research advisor who oversees the research and with whom the student works closely; the research advisor need not be the same as the student's academic advisor. These projects enable individual students or small groups to study topics in a depth that is not always possible in regular courses. Management projects acquaint students with the literature dealing with localities, problems, and issues relevant to environmental management or natural resources and they provide a means of integrating and testing skills, knowledge, and judgment gained in formal coursework. Master's degree projects frequently enable students to help solve problems in local communities or to contribute to the academic literature. Project courses are distinct from courses that allow for independent study that is additional to, and not intended for, fulfillment of the project requirement of the individual's degree program. Independent study course numbers are listed separately near the end of the Bulletin. Project courses and independent study may be assigned three or more credits, and more than one project course may be taken towards fulfillment of the 48 credits needed to graduate.

Keywords:
earth science,climate,ecology,biodiversity,sustainable development,sustainability,health,urban ecosystems,environmental management

Master of Forest Science and Master of Environmental Science

Specialzation:

Department:
School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Degree Type:
Masters
Website:
http://environment.yale.edu/about/Master-of-Forest-Science-MFS-and-Master-of-Environmental-Science---MESC/
Language:
English
Description:

The Master of Forest Science and the Master of Environmental Science degree programs are designed for students wishing to conduct scientific research that contributes toward basic and applied knowledge. The Master of Forest Science degree is intended for those students wishing to work in forest-related topics; and the Master of Environmental Science degree is intended for students wishing to work in non-forest related environmental issues. These Science degrees are intended to provide students a deeper disciplinary focus than the Management degrees, while holding to the core value of the school that students should be allowed flexibility in course selection in order to meet their educational goals. The course of study includes formalized training in the philosophy and practice of science. Training is provided through key courses in combination with extended research. The scientific research required for this degree will be conducted in close collaboration with an environment school faculty advisor. It is therefore expected that each student will identify and work with such an advisor no later than the end of their first semester. Students should select courses that provide training in science as a way of systematically asking questions about the social and natural world. Students should come away with an understanding of the basic philosophy of science and broad appreciation for the various components of scientific methodology, including systematic observation, hypothesis formu- lation and hypothesis testing. Students should also come to understand the challenges presented when studying systems in the context of anthropogenic environments and human populations, the link between study design and analysis of data, and the relationship between science and society. The course of study should also give students grounding in scientific and professional ethics. Students should think of their two-year program as an integrated whole, which begins with an emphasis on theory, research design, and methods in the first year (ideally directed towards the submission of funding proposals during the second semester, for research carried out during the following summer), with the second year emphasizing data analysis and write-up leading to publishable scholarly work In addition to conducting an extensive research project, students will be expected to gain proficiency in six major areas of instruction, with the understanding that in some fields more than one of these areas may be covered within a single course. Students should consult their academic advisors regarding selection of courses within the school, as well as elsewhere in the university, to meet these requirements. Theoretical Foundation Mastery of a body of theoretical literature is necessary to develop a research question, complete research, and write a publishable report. The specific body of literature that must be mastered varies depending on the student's specialization. Faculty advisors have their specializations and teach the theory of that specialization in separate courses. There are as many options here as there are faculty members. Science Methodology Science is a systematic process aimed at gaining reliable and defensible knowledge in as objective a manner as possible. Mastery of the scientific enterprise requires a solid grounding in the philosophy underlying the different aspects of scientific methodology (i.e., induction, hypothesis formulation, deduction and systematic hypothesis testing) and appreciation of their limitations. Students should also learn the steps one takes to develop a rigorous research proposal, including how to formulate an interesting research question and how to develop a research plan that elaborates the systematic steps that will be followed to answer the question. Finally, students should gain understanding of professional ethics and norms of conduct in executing research and reporting scientific data. Study Design There are many ways that scientific research can generate data and insights about the environment. But a rigorous data gathering process is predicated on proper a priori study design. Students are, therefore, expected to study how to elaborate the theoretical principles related to the study they plan to execute as well as apply the design principles in their discipline. Appropriate courses could include statistical sampling methodology, experimental design, the design and execution of questionnaires, polls and surveys, and qualitative research methods.Analytical Skills The form of data analysis is highly variable across disciplines owing to variability in the methods and instruments by which data are gathered and the way data are analyzed to answer research questions. But the skill to elucidate patterns in data, generate hypotheses based on the data, and to use data to adjudicate among competing research hypotheses, is a universal requirement across the sciences. Accordingly, students will be expected to be broadly trained in the use of both qualitative and quantitative data analysis techniques. After gaining such training, students will be free to employ the data analysis methods in their projects as appropriate for their disciplines. Appropriate courses should include a statistics course as well as course coverage of other topics, as appropriate such as analysis of data from textual and archival sources, analysis of survey data, quantitative analysis of experimental data, or mathematical modeling of biophysical processes. All such coursework should provide training beyond the introductory level so that research that requires statistical analysis, hypothesis testing, or statistical modeling can be conducted in a credible manner. Every year, many intermediate or advanced courses are taught within the school and throughout the university, especially in the departments of economics, statistics and biostatistics, anthropology, sociology, and political science. Analytical skills may also be learned in one-on-one project courses with the research advisor. Technical Skills Coursework may be required to attain technical skills needed to execute a particular research project. Appropriate coursework may range from field courses, training in measurement and sample analysis techniques to foreign language proficiency. Application of Scientific Knowledge In keeping with the School's mission of engagement with the real world, students are expected to do coursework that addresses the application of scientific data to environmental problem solving. Appropriate coursework could provide students understanding of the social, political, economic perspectives of environmental management, and/or the application of data in the policy-making and management process. Independent Research Students must complete extensive, independent research under the guidance of the research advisor to fulfill their degree requirements, so each student must enroll in independent research courses to receive credit for this research. Course numbers for independent research are provided near the end of the School Bulletin. These are distinct from independent study courses (course numbers are listed near the end of the Bulletin), which are additional to, and not intended for, fulfillment of the research requirement of the individual's MFS or MESc degree program. Students may enroll in a sequence of one or more of these courses to complete their research and they may sign up for three or more credits per semester depending on the research effort. Students are expected to complete, at a minimum, a substantial scholarly piece that culminates from the principles of study design, execution and analysis of data learned in other courses. The scholarly piece should report on the study's theoretical context, major research questions, design, execution and findings. This may take the form of a single research article or a collection of several chapters (drafts of which may be written in regular courses). Whatever form it takes, the expectation is that the MFS or MESc research will produce by the end of the program a significant piece of scholarship that is publishable in a peer-reviewed journal or other forum. Research Presentation An important part of conducting research is communicating research findings to the wider scientific community. Therefore, as part of their degree requirement, students must present the findings of their research at the annual Masters Student Research Colloquium. Students will receive a grade of Satisfactory Completion for this effort.The signature of the student's faculty research advisor, attesting to the appropriate selection of courses to fulfill these requirements, will be required on the student's MESc/MFS Program Review Form.

Keywords:
sustainability,environement,biostatistics,biometry,environmental measurement

Master of Forestry

Specialzation:

Department:
School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Degree Type:
Masters
Website:
http://environment.yale.edu/academics/degrees/mf
Language:
English
Description:

This program is designed for individuals who want to be at the forefront of forest resource management and policy. The Master of Forestry program is aimed at training professionals for administration and management of forest lands, and for mediating among conflicting social and economic forces affecting forests. Forest systems cover one-third of the terrestrial surface of the earth and make critically important contributions to human societies. Currently, the pressures of economic development, population growth, and energy use challenge the sustainability of forest values as never before in human history.Since 1900, the Master of Forestry program has provided leadership in the education of professional foresters. It is the oldest continuing forestry program in the western hemisphere. Almost all the early foresters in North America were educated at Yale. Graduates include such notables as Aldo Leopold, M.F. '09 and Starker Leopold, M.F. '38, nine of the first twelve chiefs of the USDA Forest Service and the fathers of forest ecology and silviculture in North America: Clarence Korstian, M.F. '26; Harold Lutz, M.F. '27; Stephen Spurr, M.F. '40 and David Smith, M.F. '46).The Master of Forestry curriculum takes an interdisciplinary approach rooted in the biological basis of ecosystems.Two-Year Program.The broad objective of the two-year MF program is realized by requiring a suite of formal course work coupled with a progressive synthesis of knowledge in a significant project. Students take many local, regional, national, and international trips to witness the practice of forestry in diverse settings. They learn management at Yale Forest and in a host of internships offered through the Global Institute for Sustainable Forestry and the Tropical Resources Institute. Students also engage in workshops, hear visiting speakers of national and international repute, and contribute to publications of the Yale Forest Forum.The teaching objectives of the M.F. program are (1) to integrate knowledge about forests, natural resources, and society to form a sound basis for making management decisions; (2) to provide electives and other educational opportunities to specialize by focusing on a particular land use or management issue concerning forest ecosystem management; (3) to provide opportunities for independent problem solving, critical thinking, and self-development. All core courses at F&ES are designated as natural, social, or quantitative science, and all students must take a mixture. The capstone course addresses management skills and, in particular, leadership.The two-year program leading to the Master of Forestry degree is accredited by the Society of American Foresters. Founded in 1900 by Gifford Pinchot and six other pioneer foresters, the Society's role as accrediting body for forestry in the United States is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation. For this reason, the degree is widely accepted in other regions and countries with similar professional standards. In recent years there has also been a growing recognition of required professional licensing and registration for all resource managers in the United States, particularly in the Northeast and West Coast regions, or for individuals working in any of the federal agencies, e.g., the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. In most of these states and agencies, an accredited professional degree is usually the first requirement. A minimum of two full years in residence and sixteen full courses is required for completion of this program.Students are required to choose courses in different topic areas of the biological and physical science sections of basic knowledge. Students with previous relevant coursework may petition their advisor to waive courses that they have had for requirements under A and B. This has to be clearly apparent?for example: a student who majored in economics as an undergraduate should not need to do the economics requirement; or a student with a forestry undergraduate major should not need to take silviculture. No substitutions will be allowed for requirements under C and D. No student will be required to repeat previously taken coursework. Two themes dominate the structure of the Master of Forestry curriculum: multiple disciplinary exposure and progressive integration and synthesis of knowledge. These themes are represented by three educational stages: Stage OneBasic knowledge is the development of an information base. This can be described as a process of assimilating knowledge, understanding values, and comprehending the relationships between knowledge and values that form essential concepts and hypotheses within the biological, social, and physical disciplines. This stage can be regarded as the baseline upon which the remaining framework for synthesizing and integrating knowledge for management decisions is built. This curriculum encourages students to understand the resource, people and science before developing policy. Stage TwoFrameworks and skills for integrating knowledge provides many of the analytical techniques and tools for synthesis and analysis. This stage includes courses that teach techniques and frameworks as well as quantitative skills for both temporal and spatial measurement.Stage Three This stage includes both synthesis and analysis of knowledge and the capstone. Generally, students take these courses during their second-year. Both are designed to address and prepare students for solving important problems in the real world. Courses concerning resource management focus on increasing the student's ability to ask relevant questions, in useful sequences, and to gather data to answer these questions. These courses are designed to maintain high faculty-student and student-student interaction. A significant project component is expected in these courses, some being client-driven while others are research reports or assessments. These projects are intended to be of high professional/academic caliber, publishable as part of the school's communications or in recognized journals. Another category concerning professional knowledge strives to provide aspects of forestry that broaden and add to the student's knowledge base from a professional perspective. The topic areas selected do not necessarily address basic or advanced science perspectives within a discipline. The capstone course in our program addresses leadership, among other management skills, a characteristic that we have sought to strengthen in all of our students since the inception of the school. Electives allow the student to choose a variety of courses, or to concentrate on a particular area as a specialization. Specializations are constructed by the student and his or her advisor. Their focus should be a particular land use or management issue concerning forest resources. The flexibility of course choice within the required topic areas of the MF curriculum also allows the student to tailor required courses to a desired specialization. Sample specializations: 1) community development and social forestry; 2) Protected areas management; 3) extension and education; 4) consulting and business; 5) watershed health and restoration; 6) tropical forest management; and 7) forest industry and finance.

Keywords:
forest,ecology,soils,hydrology,biometeorology,anthropology,resource,environmental management,agriculture

Undergraduate Major in Environmental Studies

Specialzation:

Department:
Environmental Studies
Degree Type:
Bachelors
Website:
http://www.yale.edu/evst/
Language:
English
Description:

Study in an area of concentration provides the knowledge, skills, and techniques in a particular field that students will need to pursue an original piece of work and write an essay as a senior under the direction of the faculty. Students plan their concentration in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the student's advisor. A concentration is defined as six courses that provide depth in a field of interest; four courses should be intermediate and upper level electives from a single department or program and at least two additional electives from relevant disciplines outside the immediate area of concentration forming a coherent area of study. Areas of concentration may be centered in a department. Those on the following list work well, but others are also possible: Anthropology, Economics, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Engineering, Geology and Geophysics, History, or Political Science, and programs such as American Studies, International Studies, or one of the area studies, Latin American, East Asian Studies, Ethics, Politics, and Economics, Urban Studies, or the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. It is also possible to develop an area of concentration between several departments centered on a particular theme that the student wants to pursue in depth.Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary major. Its foundation is a basic grounding in chemistry, biology, and math, combined with core courses addressing the environment. On this broad foundation, students build their own areas of concentration and senior research. However, the primary criterion for approval is the availability of courses supporting the concentration, and the availability of faculty to provide guidanceStudents interested in History as an area of concentration should plan to include at least one of the history department's junior seminars dealing with environmental history in their program. These seminars provide instruction in analyzing sources, interpreting evidence and the art of historical writing. This might also be valuable experience for other students in environmental studies

Keywords:
sustainability,food,agriculture,climate change,energy,health,chemicals,bioldiversity,conservation,water,resource,genetics

International Alliance of Research Universities

Website:
http://www.iaruni.org
Area / Region:
Global 
Description:

The International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) is a collaboration between ten of the world's leading research-intensive universities who share similar visions for higher education, in particular the education of future leaders.IARU is jointly addressing grand challenges facing humanity. The Alliance has identified sustainable solutions on climate change as one of its key initiatives. As a demonstration of its commitment to promote sustainability, IARU has sought to lead by example through the establishment of the Campus Sustainability Programs aimed at reducing the environmental impact of our campus activities. IARU has also successfully organized an International Scientific Congress on Climate Change in 2009. Some of its members have also cooperated on major research projects pertaining to ageing, longevity and health, global security and sustainable cities. 

Activities:
A set of global education initiatives aimed at cultivating a sense of global citizenship and leadership amongst students was also jointly developed under IARU. The Global Summer Program, the Sustainability Fellowships, and internships offer opportunities for students at the IARU member universities to engage critically as global citizens in an increasingly interconnected world.Besides enriching students, the Alliance also brings considerable diversity in the promotion of institutional joint working among its members, inter-university networking and staff development. Projects include Women and Men in Globalising Universities, HR Benchmarking, Value of Research Intensive Universities, Alumni Association and Leadership Best Practice. 
Members:

Australian National University, National University of Singapore, Peking University, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University of Tokyo, University of California Berkeley, University of Cambridge, University of Copenhagen, University of Oxford, Yale University 

The International Sustainable Campus Network

Website:
http://www.international-sustainable-campus-network.org/
Area / Region:
Global 
Description:

The International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) provides a global forum to support leading colleges, universities, and corporate campuses in the exchange of information, ideas, and best practices for achieving sustainable campus operations and integrating sustainability in research and teaching.The ISCN is an initiative which is graciously supported and directed by ?cole Polytechnique F?d?rale de Lausanne (EPFL) and The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich).  

Activities:
The mission of the International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) is to provide a global forum to support leading colleges, universities, and corporate campuses in the exchange of information, ideas, and best practices for achieving sustainable campus operations and integrating sustainability in research and teaching. 
Members:

Brown University, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Carnegie Mellon University, Chatham University, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Georgetown University, Harvard University, Indian Institutes of Technology, Madras, INSEAD The Business School for the World, Johns Hopkins University, Keio University, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, London School of Economics and Political Science, University of London, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, National University of Singapore, Peking University, Politecnico di Milano, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Stanford University, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University of British Columbia, University of Tokyo, Tsinghua University, Universidad Internacional del Ecuador, University of Cape Town, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, University of Hong Kong, , University of Melbourne, University of Oregon, University of Pennsylvania, University of Western Australia, Yale University 



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